Wednesday, April 12, 2017

The Invisibles

12th April is International Day for Street Children
Here are some stats from Delhi to highlight how grave this issue is:
  • Our city has 51,000 of them.20% are girls.
  • 70% have their home, but don't want to go back - mostly due to parental issues or family/neighbourhood insecurity.
  • 50.5% are illiterate. 87% earn a living—20% as ragpickers, 15.8% as street vendors,  15% by begging.
  • Over 50% have suffered verbal, physical or sexual abuse.
  • Fewer than 20% have ID cards or birth certificates, and so they miss out on government schemes.
Quick ways in which you can help:
  • Volunteer: The most direct method. Join a NGO, Temple, or Gurudwara and ask if they need any help or know any local programs in which you can take part.
  • Give A Moment: Rather than brushing them off to make your way, spend 5 minutes to ask them their names, what they like to do, or their favourite games. Just talk.
  • Initiate Informal Education: If there are any particular street children you see every day, help them with basic literacy or numeracy skills. You can also teach them 'soft skills' like self-expression, patience, self-discipline and sharing - which are social skills that children would normally pick up in a nurturing home environment.
Between feeling upset and wanting to help these children enjoy a normal life, you, me, we all can make a small, tiny difference somewhere.

Saturday, April 8, 2017

Positive Thinking & Meditation

Positive thinking is overrated.
How?
Let me give you an example – do you remind your name to yourself every day? “No”, right? Because you are so sure of it. You have been hearing it ever since you remember. You have developed a personality around it, and act according to it. That’s the surely you name has brought into your life.

So why not be sure of everything? Every task, situation, relationship – why not have the confidence that you have the power to sought it through? Why not practice spirituality at work and become the most awesome version of yours?
Searching ‘Positive Thinking’ on Google gives 2,96,00,000 results. More the interpretations, more the confusion over it. Let’s simplify:
  1. Positive thinking is the art of believing that everything is perfectly like as it is supposed to be. It doesn’t mean you keep on reminding yourself that. It means, you believe that.
  2. It is constant meditation. Being positive means to be in touch with your inner being and taking even the minutest decisions like ‘what to wear’ or ‘how to lose weight’ (in my case J) with peace. Playing meditation music in the mornings helps to build the mood.
  3. It reduces influx of stray thoughts, and keeps your mind focussed.
  4. It induces creativity. With a calmer mind, you observe more, and become less judgemental.
Nothing else, but a lot more. Keep on discovering!
And if you get, read these simple rules to make life better, happy & light. Send your comments at nitima@writingroutes.com
Shine on :-)

Thursday, March 23, 2017

Being Like Water


I am an easy person. I don’t get into conflicts, raise my voice, or get influenced easily. Over the years, I’ve created plans for self-improvement, and tried spirituality to concentrate on ways that make me calmer.

So when this incident happened, within which I became a part of a rumour, and had to hear rubbish allegations, letting go became difficult. It was the situation of double confusion – my spirituality was telling my mind to let it go and move on, but my heart wanted to react – it wanted me to use strong words to reply back to the lady who had put me in a fix. And then I read somewhere – be like water.

Absolutely loved the concept of being open – rather than dominating my forcefulness, I tried to let my emotions go wherever there was an opening. I softened my hard edges (accepting that I too can be incorrect was difficult), and tried to become tolerant of others’ opinions. I pictured myself with same qualities as of water – free to flow, allowed myself to be soft, weak, and yet yielding, flowing delicately into the lives of those who created the hurt. I let my thoughts go beyond to enter their private inner selves, allowed them to see (perhaps for the first time) their own experiences with me – kept this image of me as gently coursing water, and watched my relationships change.

Wednesday, November 25, 2015

1 Step Plan to Kill Arrogance

As you know from my two previous posts, Being Humble and Time, Spirituality and Happiness, I’ve been an avid encourager of practical spirituality.

Usually during the middle of week, I feel the urge of sharing my experiences. Today, in honor of the “Tolerant/Intolerant” debate, I’m going to share the best self improvement tip in my arsenal. This may not be the most valuable advice on killing your arrogance you ever had. Heck, you might not even remember it after an hour, but I’ll still share. Are you ready?


Accept others’ mistakes.
That’s it. Whether it’s once or even 10 times – accept the people as they are and move on. Day by day, build this habit. Keep a journal of your feelings, challenge yourself in new situations. Seems pretty simple, but it’s something all of us struggle with at one time or another. Improving oneself is important, and many posts on this blog and others can be helpful – but you can’t progress unless you try. I know that’s not what you want to hear, and I truly wish there was an easy way, but I’m sorry. That’s just the way it is. Nothing is easy, especially not being tolerant in relationships.

I also know you want to improve – otherwise you wouldn’t be here, would you? Maybe you are thinking about making yourself a better human being, and once you’ve read everything, you’ll become a stunningly amazing individual. May be you’ve tried to shed arrogance but it attacks you at your weakest moment, and disheartenly you backed out. But not anymore.  

Just do it. Become more receptive to others’ ideas, their nature and their way of handling daily crisis.

Accepting others the way they are is hard. Only people who have never worked on themselves will tell you otherwise. You’re not alone in feeling that way. More than one of great saints has likened acceptance of others as living the awful parts of life,  wounding yourself, bashing your head against the actual feelings. But you still need to do it. For now, don’t worry too much about how may hurt you again, or you might not be taken seriously, or any of that serious stuff. For now, just worry about taking a step into practical spirituality and divorcing the arrogance.

Maybe you are already aware about your feelings and know the ways to overcome them, and you really just want to know how to control your frustration, irritation, anger, or a different method of finding your peace. That’s great. Please see the tag cloud to the left. I’ll be back soon with another practical spirituality article. This week, however, I need to work on a few writing projects.
Super Blog Directory

Monday, July 27, 2015

RIP Dr. Abdul Kalam, My President Till Now

Today is turning out to be one of those days that you wished had never come. After terrorist attack at Gurdaspur, one of my favorite persons - APJ Abdul Kalam - has died. The last I felt such sinking feeling in my heart was on the death of Jaspal Bhatti.

Of all the things I've learnt from him, two come to my mind instantly:
  • Simplicity: No body can imagine that Dr. Kalam, after leaving Rashtrapati Home, stayed in a one and half room hut with a small bathroom till the time he was allocated a permanent home.
  • Motivation: He was born to motivate people.Even today, he died in the moment he loved doing. When we read about Dr.Kalam, he has written that he wanted to be a pilot but couldn't clear the physical tests. But its amazing how many people he gave wings to fly.
There's so much more that i want to write, but words are failing me. Will continue later.

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

Dealing with Criticism

Accepting Criticism An issue For You? For me it was. For a long time, I shielded under the cover of “sensitivism”. I reacted & defended, had mood swings and felt unhappy.

Then the understanding of human behavior (especially my own) started to make sense. I learnt that somebody else’s criticism is not a reflection of my entire character. It was only related to a part of service that I had offered them, or some action that they witnessed. They were the same people who had praised me in past, or were nice to me otherwise. So the mind started identifying the situations, which weren’t plenty. This led me to make a five step plan. While it wasn’t possible for me to use all the steps together, I just made it a point to remember them at the right moment and try the best option.
  1. I learnt that not every situation demanded a prompt action, and that sometimes, it was on me to control it. Learning this helped me to control my reaction time, gave me more than a few moments to think, and plan my response accordingly
  2. I stopped defending myself. It helped to break my ego and accept others’ point-of-view gracefully as doing so was not only an act of futility. I began using the feeling of “free spirit”, realized that I’m an adult who lives in the land of the free, and acted like it.
  3. Gave in to ignite the introspective mood. I accepted that nothing is perfect, and I only needed to work a little more to get closer to it. There was a lot to be thankful for, and counting my blessings helped to lift the spirits.
  4. Informed the criticizer that I was aware of the underlying causes, and showed that I cared about improving myself. It helped me gain myself confidence, and brush aside the comments that weren’t given in the right spirit or motive.
  5. Read the feedback about others –authors, artists, actors, public figures, companies- no one was actually free from criticism. At some point or other, each one of them had to deal with unfavorable responses (most of the time in complete public glare). It taught me that no one actually cares, and the best way to deal with any form of criticism was to move forward.


Now, it’s been sometime that I’ve let anyone’s criticism hurt me. Though the journey to inner peace is still on, I feel proud of improving myself day-by-day. There’s a lot to be done still, sort jumbled emotions, and so the effort is still on.

Monday, April 27, 2015

Story of My Life

My husband beats me every day. I'm used to it now. I don't complain. I don't cry any more. 
It's time to get up and move on. I stand on my feet and put the chessboard back. One day, I'll beat him in the game he has conquered in!

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